3D Areola Tattoo 2018-11-27T07:05:12+00:00

3D AREOLA TATTOOING

WHAT IS 3D NIPPLE AREOLA TATTOOING?

A specialty area of medical tattooing that requires advanced education, training, and experience. This procedure helps improve the appearance and self-esteem of women who have undergone breast surgery.  3D nipple areola tattooing techniques can “create” a nipple & areola after breast reconstruction, minimize the appearance of scars, or restore a nipple areola to a more natural looking color and shape.

WHY IS 3D NIPPLE AREOLA TATTOOING IMPORTANT AFTER BREAST SURGERY?

The areola is part of the human breast.  It is a circular area of skin around the nipple that is often darker and thicker than the surrounding skin.  The areola plays a key role in the aesthetic look of a breast.  Since a woman’s self-image can depend on the appearance of her breasts, a missing areola can be psychologically devastating.  A woman can survive breast cancer after undergoing a mastectomy, and she can regain her figure with breast reconstruction. 3D nipple areola tattooing provides the “finishing touch” after breast surgery.  Patients feel the tattooing process helps them during the last part of their recovery to look complete and feel “whole” again.

One of the most rewarding aspects of being intradermal cosmetic artists is working with breast cancer survivors. Combining experience, artistic ability and proper color selection, we can create the illusion of real nipples/areola’s post mastectomy. Scars look less obvious once the natural color is added back into the skin. Although the most natural appearance is a nipple grafted or created by the plastic surgeon, often the patient chooses against additional surgery. With the addition of highlights and shadows, we can create the illusion of a nipple appearing to protrude.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

We work closely with each client to find opportunities to lessen or resolve financial burdens. Thankfully, there are grants available via The United Breast Cancer Foundation to help offset the expenses of 3D Areola Tattooing. To learn more visit their website here.

STATISTICS

  • About 1 in 8 U.S. women (about 12.4%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.
  • In 2018, an estimated 266,120 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 63,960 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.
  • About 2,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in men in 2018. A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.
  • Breast cancer incidence rates in the U.S. began decreasing in the year 2000, after increasing for the previous two decades. They dropped by 7% from 2002 to 2003 alone. One theory is that this decrease was partially due to the reduced use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) by women after the results of a large study called the Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.
  • About 40,920 women in the U.S. are expected to die in 2018 from breast cancer, though death rates have been decreasing since 1989. Women under 50 have experienced larger decreases. These decreases are thought to be the result of treatment advances, earlier detection through screening, and increased awareness.
  • For women in the U.S., breast cancer death rates are higher than those for any other cancer, besides lung cancer.
  • Besides skin cancer, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. In 2017, it’s estimated that about 30% of newly diagnosed cancers in women will be breast cancers.
  • In women under 45, breast cancer is more common in African-American women than white women. Overall, African-American women are more likely to die of breast cancer. For Asian, Hispanic, and Native-American women, the risk of developing and dying from breast cancer is lower.
  • As of January 2018, there are more than 3.1 million women with a history of breast cancer in the U.S. This includes women currently being treated and women who have finished treatment.
  • A woman’s risk of breast cancer nearly doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Less than 15% of women who get breast cancer have a family member diagnosed with it.
  • About 5-10% of breast cancers can be linked to gene mutations (abnormal changes) inherited from one’s mother or father. Mutations of the BRCA1and BRCA2 genes are the most common. On average, women with a BRCA1 mutation have a 55-65% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. For women with a BRCA2 mutation, the risk is 45%. Breast cancer that is positive for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations tends to develop more often in younger women. An increased ovarian cancer risk is also associated with these genetic mutations. In men, BRCA2 mutations are associated with a lifetime breast cancer risk of about 6.8%; BRCA1 mutations are a less frequent cause of breast cancer in men.
  • About 85% of breast cancers occur in women who have no family history of breast cancer. These occur due to genetic mutations that happen as a result of the aging process and life in general, rather than inherited mutations.
  • The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are gender (being a woman) and age (growing older).

SOURCE: BREASTCANCER.ORG

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